Wek’eezhii Renewable Resource Board

About Us

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Community Projects

Wek-eezhii Renewable Resources Board, Northwest Territories
JODY PELLISSEY, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

102A, 4504-49th Avenue,
Yellowknife, NT X1A 1A7

 Among the Tłı̨chǫ, the people of Whatı̀ have always been known as having productive fisheries and knowing tǫdzı (boreal caribou). When discussing fisheries and tǫdzı, the impact of climate change on water levels has become a constant topic of conversation among elders and harvesters. Community members want youth to understand the relationship between todzi, water, and fish; and how to respect each to ensure that they thrive. For the elders and harvesters, it is important for the success of the fisheries to ensure that people follow the ‘laws’ associated with traveling on the lake and respecting the fish when preparing them for immediate and long-term use. Four elders, one principal investigator, and at least one Tłı̨chǫ university student, and several high school students, who are currently participants in the Tłı̨chǫ Government’s Tłı̨chǫ Įmbè program, will spend time with elders and community researchers participating in the ‘Tǫdzı and Wildfire’ research camp, during which time they will hear stories of fish, todzi and water. They will document this information, and hear – from elders — how to monitor and manage human behaviour in conjunction with the changing water environment.  Our main questions is: What do elders, fishers and tǫdzı hunters have to say about changing aquatic environments and the species that depend on it?

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